British Isles

Past and Present

Custom Search

Sources

  • Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
  • Bede
  • Gildas
  • Historia Brittonum
  • Confession of St Patrick
  • Articles

  • End of Roman rule
  • Tribal Militias
  • After Roman Rule
  • Post-Roman Britain
  • The Saxon Invasion
  • The Age of Saints
  • Pagan Religions in Britain
  • Nations
  • Evidence
  • The Picts
  • Ogham and the Irish in Britain
  • Scotti and Scots
  • 'Teutonic' England
  • Books

  • Dark Age Books
  • Anglo-Saxon Books
  • Orkney Books
  • Pict Books
  • Viking Books
  • Early Welsh History

  • After Rome

    After Rome: C.400-c.800

    Thomas Charles-Edwards (Editor). The chapters in this volume, each written by a leading scholar of the period, analyse in turn the different nationalities and kingdoms that existed in the British Isles from the end of the Roman empire to the coming of the Vikings, the process of conversion to Christianity, the development of art and of a written culture, and the interaction between this written culture and the societies of the day. Available from:  

    Amazon.co.uk - British pounds
    Amazon.com - US dollars
    Amazon.ca - Canadian dollars
    Amazon.de - Euros
    Amazon.fr - Euros

    A.D.46 - A.D. 199

    A.D. 46. This year Claudius, the second of the Roman emperors who invaded Britain, took the greater part of the island into his power, and added the Orkneys to rite dominion of the Romans. This was in the fourth year of his reign. And in the same year (12) happened the great famine in Syria which Luke mentions in the book called "The Acts of the Apostles". After Claudius Nero succeeded to the empire, who almost lost the island Britain through his incapacity.

    ((A.D. 46. This year the Emperor Claudius came to Britain, and subdued a large part of the island; and he also added the island of Orkney to the dominion of the Romans.))

    A.D. 47. This year Mark, the evangelist in Egypt beginneth to write the gospel.

    ((A.D. 47. This was in the fourth year of his reign, and in this same year was the great famine in Syria which Luke speaks of in the book called "Actus Apostolorum".))

    ((A.D. 47. This year Claudius, king of the Romans, went with an army into Britain, and subdued the island, and subjected all the Picts and Welsh to the rule of the Romans.))

    A.D. 50. This year Paul was sent bound to Rome.

    A.D. 62. This year James, the brother of Christ, suffered.

    A.D. 63. This year Mark the evangelist departed this life.

    A.D. 69. This year Peter and Paul suffered.

    A.D. 70. This year Vespasian undertook the empire.

    A.D. 71. This year Titus, son of Vespasian, slew in Jerusalem eleven hundred thousand Jews.

    A.D. 81. This year Titus came to the empire, after Vespasian, who said that he considered the day lost in which he did no good.

    A.D. 83. This year Domitian, the brother of Titus, assumed the government.

    A.D. 84. This year John the evangelist in the island Patmos wrote the book called "The Apocalypse".

    A.D. 90. This year Simon, the apostle, a relation of Christ, was crucified: and John the evangelist rested at Ephesus.

    A.D. 92. This year died Pope Clement.

    A.D. 110. This year Bishop Ignatius suffered.

    A.D. 116. This year Hadrian the Caesar began to reign.

    A.D. 145. This year Marcus Antoninus and Aurelius his brother succeeded to the empire.

    ((A.D. 167. This year Eleutherius succeeded to the popedom, and held it fifteen years; and in the same year Lucius, king of the Britons, sent and begged baptism of him. And he soon sent it him, and they continued in the true faith until the time of Diocletian.))

    A.D. 189. This year Severus came to the empire; and went with his army into Britain, and subdued in battle a great part of the island. Then wrought he a mound of turf, with a broad wall thereupon, from sea to sea, for the defence of the Britons. He reigned seventeen years; and then ended his days at York. His son Bassianus succeeded him in the empire. His other son, who perished, was called Geta. This year Eleutherius undertook the bishopric of Rome, and held it honourably for fifteen winters. To him Lucius, king of the Britons, sent letters, and prayed that he might be made a Christian. He obtained his request; and they continued afterwards in the right belief until the reign of Diocletian.

    A.D. 199. In this year was found the holy rood. (13)

    Previous page

    Next page

    Early & Middle Saxon Rural Settlement in the London Region

    Early & Middle Saxon Rural Settlement in the London Region by Robert Cowie and Lyn Blackmore. Until now the evidence for London's Early and Middle Saxon rural settlement and economy has received scant attention. This monograph provides a long-awaited overview of the subject, drawing on the results of six decades of archaeological fieldwork since the war, in addition to historical and place-name evidence. Some of the material has been published before and will be familiar to the reader, but much of it has only been available as site archives or unpublished reports, and at best briefly summarised as notes in excavation round-ups. This synthesis therefore forms an indispensable guide to researchers. The first part focuses on twenty-six sites and six fish traps across the region, followed by thematic sections on a range of topics, and then a final section on the pottery finds. Available from:  

    Amazon.co.uk - British pounds
    Amazon.com - US dollars
    Amazon.ca - Canadian dollars
    Amazon.de - Euros
    Amazon.fr - Euros



    Copyright © 2009-2018 Alan Price and IslandGuide.co.uk contributors. All rights reserved. Island Guide makes minimal use of cookies, including some placed to facilitate features such as Google Search. By continuing to use the site you are agreeing to the use of cookies. Learn more here