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  • After Rome

    After Rome: C.400-c.800

    Thomas Charles-Edwards (Editor). The chapters in this volume, each written by a leading scholar of the period, analyse in turn the different nationalities and kingdoms that existed in the British Isles from the end of the Roman empire to the coming of the Vikings, the process of conversion to Christianity, the development of art and of a written culture, and the interaction between this written culture and the societies of the day. Available from:  

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    The Anglo-Saxon Library

    The Anglo-Saxon Library

    by Michael Lapidge
    The cardinal role of Anglo-Saxon libraries in the transmission of classical and patristic literature to the later middle ages has long been recognized, for these libraries sustained the researches of those English scholars whose writings determined the curriculum of medieval schools: Aldhelm, Bede, and Alcuin, to name only the best known. Yet this is the first full-length account of the nature and holdings of Anglo-Saxon libraries from the sixth century to the eleventh.
    More information and prices from:
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    Manuscripts from the Anglo Saxon Age

    Manuscripts from the Anglo Saxon Age

    by Michelle P. Brown
    This new book provides an authoritative introduction to the art of book production in the Anglo-Saxon period and an historical overview of the period by means of its book culture, and illustrates in colour over 140 examples of the finest Anglo-Saxon books in The British Library and other major collections.
    More information and prices from:
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    The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

    The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

    by James Ingram
    The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle: Originally compiled on the orders of King Alfred the Great, approximately A. D. 890, and subsequently maintained and added to by generations of anonymous scribes until the middle of the 12th Century. The original language is Anglo-Saxon (Old English), but later entries are essentially Middle English in tone. Translation by Rev. James Ingram (London, 1823), with additional readings from the translation of Dr. J.A. Giles (London, 1847).
    More information and prices from:
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    Introduction to Old English

    Introduction to Old English

    by Peter Baker
    "Introduction to Old English" is the leading text available designed to help students engage with Old English literary and historical texts for the first time. This new edition builds on the success of the original and includes an expanded anthology and new, easy-to-use glossary. The book's rich pedagogy includes basic grammar reviews at the beginning of each major chapter, covering the foundations of Old English. Other features include 'minitexts' for practice in reading the language, and a detailed introduction to meter and style that eases the transition from prose to poetry. The original anthology of 14 readings has also been expanded to include four new texts: Alfric's Sermon on the "Book of Job"; The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle entry (1087) on William the Conqueror; "The Voyages of Ohthere and Wulfstan" from the "Old English Orosius"; and "The Battle of Maldon". "Introduction to Old English" is an essential text for all students encountering the field for the first time.
    More information and prices from:
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    The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England

    The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England

    Michael Lapidge (Editor)
    The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England is a major reference-work covering the history, archaeology, arts, architecture, literatures and languages of England from the Roman withdrawal to the Norman Conquest (c.450 - 1066 AD). Drawing on contributions by scholars of international standing, the book comprises a series of some 700 articles by 150 contributors, arranged in alphabetical order, describing the people, places, activities and creations of the Anglo-Saxons.
    More information and prices from:
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    A Guide to Old English
    A Guide to Old English (6th edition 2001)
    Bruce Mitchell, Fred Robinson (Editors)
    A Guide to Old English is now the standard and most popular introduction to Old English language and literature. Although most readers of A Guide to Old English will be undergraduate and graduate students, the book has been written so that it can be used by those working on their own who wish simply to gain a greater understanding and enjoyment of the language and literature of the Anglo-Saxons.
    Available from: amazon.com US$
    Available from: amazon.co.uk UKú


    Anglo-Saxon England
    Anglo-Saxon England (3rd edition 2001)
    Frank M. Stenton
    The classic book on the Anglo-Saxons. A 'must have' even if it is a bit dated.
    Available from: amazon.com US$
    Available from: amazon.co.uk UKú


    The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
    The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
    Michael Swanton (editor) Published 2000
    Made up of annals written in the monasteries of Winchester, Canterbury, Peterborough, Abingdon, and Worcester, The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle marks the beginning of the unmannered simplicity of English prose. Ranging from the start of the Christian era to 1154, the uniqueness of the chronicle as an historical and literary document makes it of compelling interest throughout. The historical, linguistic and literary importance of The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is without parallel.
    Available from: amazon.com US$ (different cover)
    Available from: amazon.co.uk UKú


    The Anglo-Saxon State
    The Anglo-Saxon State
    James Campbell Published 2001
    These essays make a case for how unified and well-governed Anglo-Saxon England was, and how numerous and wealthy its inhabitants were. By asking questions about the Anglo-Saxons, and by offering answers to people that question historical orthodoxy, this work demands the rethinking of assumptions.
    Available from: amazon.com US$
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    The Anglo-Saxon Age
    The Anglo-Saxon Age
    John Blair Published 2000
    First published as part of "The Oxford Illustrated History of Britain", John Blair's title covers the Anglo-Saxon period, from the emergence of the earliest English settlements to the Norman victory in 1066. This book is a brief introduction to the political, social, religious and cultural history of Anglo-Saxon England. The text is intended for the general reader or student who wants a very short first introduction to the Anglo-Saxon period in British history.
    Available from: amazon.com US$
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    Migration and Mythmaking in Anglo-Saxon England
    Migration and Mythmaking in Anglo-Saxon England
    Nicholas Howe (revised and reprinted 2001)
    In this original and revisionist interpretation of Anglo-Saxon England, Nicholas Howe proposes that the Anglo-Saxons fashioned a myth out of the fifth-century migration of their Germanic ancestors to Britain. Through the retelling of this story, the Anglo-Saxons ordered their complex history and identified their destiny as a people. Howe traces the migration myth throughout the literature of the Anglo-Saxon period, in poems, sermons, letters, and histories from the sixth to the eleventh centuries.
    Available from: amazon.com US$
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